Dune Messiah Kommentare

Die ferne Zukunft: Der Kampf um Arrakis, den Wüstenplaneten, ist beendet, und Paul Atreides, genannt Muad’dib, ist von den Fremen zu ihrem Propheten ernannt worden. Sie folgen ihm bedingungslos in einen Djihad, der wie ein Sturmwind durch die. Dune Messiah continues the story of Paul Atreides, better known—and feared—​as the man christened Muad'Dib. As Emperor of the known universe, he. Dune Messiah (Dune 2, Band 2) | Herbert, Frank | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Dune Messiah continues the story of Paul Atreides, better known - and feared - as the man christened Muad'Dib. As Emperor of the Known Universe. Book Two in the Magnificent Dune Chronicles—the Bestselling Science Fiction Adventure of All Time Dune Messiah continues the story of Paul Atreides, better.

Dune Messiah

Dune Messiah continues the story of Paul Atreides, better known - and feared - as the man christened Muad'Dib. As Emperor of the Known Universe. Dune Messiah continues the story of Paul Atreides, better known - and feared - as the man christened MuadDib. As Emperor of the Known Universe. Book Two in the Magnificent Dune Chronicles—the Bestselling Science Fiction Adventure of All Time Dune Messiah continues the story of Paul Atreides, better.

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Herbert, Frank Children of Dune. The story of the man from Mars who taught humankind grokking and water-sharing-and love-it is Robert A. Herbert, Frank : Der Herr des Wüstenplaneten. Perfectbound in illustrated wrappers. Paul and his mother join the Fremen, the Arrakis natives, who have learnt to live in this harsh and Riddler Sign ecosystem. The result was a stable of top writers such as Ray Bradbury, Robert A.

Dune Messiah - Penguin LCC US

Weitere Informationen zu diesem Verkäufer Verkäufer kontaktieren 8. Dune Messiah. Lesetipp des Bukinisten! His colourful and varied career included stints as a radio news commentator and jungle survival instructor. He died in

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SO MUCH DETAIL!!... Almost Mind Numbing? (Dune Messiah REVIEW) Stattdessen beschrieb er ein ganzes zivilisatorisches Universum bis in kleinste Details des täglichen Lebens, indem er Bwin Einzahlungsbonus Code Ereignisse und Entwicklungen seiner Zeit in eine Schminkspiel Zukunft extrapolierte. Hahn ; Illustrationen, Kt. Das hat mehrere Gründe. Jetzt bewerten Jetzt bewerten. From historical legends to mythic futures, monuments of world-building to mind-bending dystopias, these touchstones of human invention and storytelling ingenuity have transported millions of readers to distant realms, and will continue for generations to chart the frontiers of the imagination. Neuerscheinungen Bücher Filme Musik Games. Bitte melden Sie sich an, um das Produkt zu bewerten. Jetzt verschenken. KG Bürgermeister-Wegele-Str. Lesetipp des Bukinisten! An epic novel of the Latest Nes Games of victory Bitte wählen Sie Ihr Anliegen aus. Weitere Informationen zu diesem Verkäufer Verkäufer kontaktieren 3. Das hat mehrere Gründe. Versand: EUR Meine Spiele Kostenlos, Der Artikel wurde der Merkliste hinzugefügt. Le Guin Neuromancer by William Gibson For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. His colourful and Casinospiele Merkur career included stints as a radio news commentator and jungle survival instructor.

In the event that one takes a gander at Dune in this light, what occurs in this spin-off, Dune Messiah appears to be correct. Your relcuctant lady of the hour, Irulan, is certain to be biting, and need just to be the conveyor of the following ruler.

In the event that you are Bene Geserit, you would effectively meddle with Paul. In the event that you are from one of the vanquished universes, you likely not be cheerful about this sharp person being ruler.

In the event that you are a Paul pupil, you will kick the bucket for him and the hell with any other person.

Hence the battle card is set: Paul and his clique versus every one of his spoilers, for all intents and purposes everybody in the universe.

Herbert gives us the pass up blow in a moderately minimized rundown. Maybe the above is a bit excessively coldhearted.

Suffice it to state that on the off chance that you hope to discover Mr. Or a husband for his wife of more than a decade? Frank Herbert wrote a book for grown ups.

All the while being heaped with a massive dose of trippy visions pulling you into the undertow of genetic and higher-thinking philosophies.

It is melancholy and poetic. So, teenage Nick, give it some time, buddy. Dune Messiah comes highly recommended from you, a man who has changed a little bit over the last twenty years.

These reviewers have just as much validity in their feelings towards the book as I do. Bolds added by me. It simply bridges the first and third.

Seriously, what is going on here? At least 30 different reviews used this terminology in my quick scan.

Firstly: What the hell is going on? Seriously, wtf? Secondly: I think most of these folks are wrong. Good stuff, Mr. View all 17 comments.

This book is very different from the first book, 'Dune' because this book has focused about the religion. I am really enjoyed reading this book Alhamdulillah.

Elements of those other aspects are still in place, but the story this time around is from people sitting at tables and discussing the existence of fate and ways to avoid prophesy rather than overthrowing evil barons.

In fact, there are times where I felt that it hardly seems like a full novel, and more like a series of short scenes Herbert wrote, pat himself on the back over how clever they were and then decided to try to tie them all together.

HA I say! The philosophy was what appealed to me the most of those aspects mentioned in Dune! I can read about people sitting at tables and talking for hours!

In fact, by the end I realized that it was an extremely well developed novel, and that it was I who was at fault for not seeing the intricacies at play.

There is no main POV character in each chapter, he will give you the thoughts of everyone, thus showing who thinks they are fooling who and who is actually fooled.

He does this and he plays it fair the entire time, yet still manages to hide plot points in plain sight, and it is extremely well played.

The first book was a masterpiece in terms of world building, here that takes a backseat to prophesies and philosophy, but Herbert does manage to introduce at least one fascinating new aspect to his universe.

The Face Dancers are introduced as assassins and shape shifters. One can walk into the room a pudgy male guard and leave as a small servant girl.

They take contracts, but with a sense of honor and a condition; they must always leave the would be victim with an opportunity to escape.

They need to know they are in danger and must be presented with an out. I find this new aspect fascinating and would have loved to see a bit more of a focus on them.

I want to close this review by briefly describing my favorite scene in the entire book; it is one of the scenes where people sit and talk at tables.

He felt it must be a prank. This is a small chamber piece… just, you know, with giant sand worms. This was a good sequel to a great book, which is actually harder to pull off than we give authors credit for.

When they set the bar so high with an exceptional first novel in a series they're expected to meet or better it which is not an easy task. I think it was very well done in this case.

We're thrust into a world where the long term consequences of actions taken in the first book are evident and seldom what we expected or what was intended.

There we This was a good sequel to a great book, which is actually harder to pull off than we give authors credit for.

There were two main points that really struck me about this book. The first was that the commentary on government and power was well developed and thoughtfully presented.

The other was the way in which seeing the future as a sequence of possibilities all changed by small actions was presented.

Usually the future is one thing and fate or destiny allow multiple paths but only one outcome. I've always found this hard to accept and find Herbert's way of dealing with knowing the future far better thought out.

I look forward to continuing the series. View all 3 comments. Second volume in the superb Dune series.

I actually liked this volume even more than Dune. If possible I would recommend listening to the audio version of this series as the production value is amazing.

I don't normally look at reviews of a book prior to writing my own take on it, but sometime I just draw a blank after finishing a book.

Perhaps authors are not subject to the same level of pressure as pop stars. At around pages Dune Messiah is about half the length of Dune , it is also very different in tone and pacing.

It starts off twelve years after the events of Dune. Our literally know it all hero Paul "Muad'Dib" Atreides is now Emperor of the known universe and is having a suitably heroic melancholic time of it on account of the jihad which caused billions of death in his name.

In the meantime powerful enemies are ganging up to snuff him out because he is too powerful, he is literally a know-it-all thanks to his oracular powers, and nobody likes a smartass.

His wife concubine can not have a baby because his legal wife slipped her some contraceptive and oracular powers apparently do not cover food additives.

To make matters worse or perhaps better his dead teacher Duncan Idaho is returned to him as a sort of clone ghola with a suspicious mission and a new highly ominous name of Hayt.

With all the odds stacked against him how can he survive? With panache of course! The first third of the book is very interesting with all the aforementioned odds being piled up against Paul, then the pacing of the book begin to sag with a lot of ruminations and philosophizing by the major characters and my mind drifted off to parts unknown.

After a rather dry or so pages the plot revives quite a bit and the climax is quite thrilling if not exactly unpredictable. This book clearly has a lot of depth, themes and subtexts, unfortunately its profundity mostly escaped me as profundities tend to do.

One of the Amazon reviewers mentioned that the book is so profound wh8ile reading it he frequently had to stop to think about what Herbert was really saying.

The stoppages I made are mostly to do with thinking about my options for lunch and other mundane things. The two central characters are less compelling than they were in the previous book, Paul is all broody and miserable, his sister Alia goes through mood swings between being supernaturally sage, overly shrill and a teenager with a crush.

Of course he is! View all 7 comments. Apr 16, edge of bubble rated it it was ok. Despite of reading and rereading Dune and falling in love with it, I've never attempted to read the rest of the series.

Now I know I haven't missed much. This was a disappointment from beginning to end. Even the writing is stuttered and to be honest boring.

You stand in a valley between dunes. I stand on the crest. I see where you do not see. And, among other things, I see mountains which conceal distances.

All power is limited. Treasonous conspirators seek to destroy the emperor. This book is slower than the first, with not much happening until the last third of the text.

It seems more like a setup for the book that follows. The world-building and mysticism make these books worth the eff You stand in a valley between dunes.

The world-building and mysticism make these books worth the effort. Finally meeting a steersman and other lifeforms has me interested in learning more.

I look forward to the next installment. Never has my fickle reader's heart been as frustrated and wrenched as it was while reading Dune Messiah.

I must have put it down and swore not to pick it up again at least three or four times, but if you know anything about Dune, that's a declaration you can't follow through on.

The Dune Chronicles just keeps getting better and better, this was probably Paul's greatest test, and damn, what a prolific writer Frank Herbert is, telling us the reader exactly what evil is being planned against the At Never has my fickle reader's heart been as frustrated and wrenched as it was while reading Dune Messiah.

The Dune Chronicles just keeps getting better and better, this was probably Paul's greatest test, and damn, what a prolific writer Frank Herbert is, telling us the reader exactly what evil is being planned against the Atriedes and letting us hope and trust Paul's prescience to get him through it all.

What a Bravo ending after such a trying tour de force of a build up. It's sad what happens to Channi and to Paul himself, but the sadness doesn't take away from the masterpiece that's the rest of the novel.

It's written so well you almost accept it as a kindness. This is a book, like Paul Atriedes himself, that I won't forget, not for a long time.

A masterpiece. While it wasn't as grand or as long as Dune, I would say Dune Messiah was a very important part of the Dune series.

This is the link between Paul and his becoming Muad'dib and his children's rule over Arrakis. Even though it was shorter, and we were already familiar with this dune world, there were many important things that took place.

This is a must read for Dune fans. Now, the reason for the three stars Dear God I hate Herbert's writing style.

Blah, blah, blah, gibber jabber. It felt at t While it wasn't as grand or as long as Dune, I would say Dune Messiah was a very important part of the Dune series.

It felt at times to be a rambling mess. You had to read at a macro level skimming at times just to understand.

Paying attention to the details only weighed you down and you had the potential to forget what the characters were even talking about.

If you can get past the blathering dialogue, then I highly recommend this to science fiction fans and especially those who read Dune and opted to treat it as a stand-alone.

I think most people don't particularly like this book, but I'm not sure why. Is it because we see that even with his awesome powers, he's still unable to map the future, to escape the future, the same as any ordinary human?

We know Paul was never going to be perfect, was never going to be an angelic being or benevolent emperor; Frank Herbert told us that in "Dune.

And yet he didn't. He continued on his course of actions, perhaps because, in his arrogance, he began to believe too much in his own mythology--Muad'Dib, the Kwisatz Haderch, the Lisan al-Gaib; perhaps he even grew to enjoy the trappings of power, underneath his disdain.

And perhaps that is what truly destroyed him, in the end: recognition of his human-ness underneath the godhead.

I found this book to be just as powerful as "Dune" as it explores what happens to the messiah once he is accepted and the changes he's wrought become routine and ritualized.

It wasn't about the world-shaking changes he brought to everyone else; it was about the psyche-shaking changes his role brought to himself, the dark side of power that defines who and what we become.

It's difficult for me to be too difficult on this book because it simply feels incomplete. About half the size of the original, it feels like a simply bridge to Children of Dune than an actual sequel to Dune.

But the theme of the story is one that Frank Herbert must have believed personally and that is Think For Yourself.

People are not gods. Gods are not governance. To deify politicians and world leaders is a can of worms that should never be opened. Fans of the original fell in love with Paul A It's difficult for me to be too difficult on this book because it simply feels incomplete.

Fans of the original fell in love with Paul Atreides and to see him essentially as a flawed leader with clay feet left a bitter taste in many mouths.

So, again, it's easy to understand the criticism. It's like if Empire Strikes Back came out and Luke turned out to be just some dude who was more lucky than gifted.

Because as a stand alone, Messiah vanishes under the vast shadow cast by its predecessor. View 1 comment. Intrigues and hidden meanings lurk around every single corner and complement Arrakis' beautiful extremes.

Mysticism, religion, holy war, politics and Tleilaxu biotech and shapeshifters complement the character development of Paul and his sister Alia - from heroes to gods and back again to normal humans.

Paul tries to stop the juggernaut but he has to put everything in it. I've read this book a couple of times, though not as often as Dune my very personal review is here.

I always wondered about its size, and if it could be understood as just another fourth part of Dune, changing the original tension arc to a very different one, a deconstruction of Paul ending in a Greek tragedy.

This time, I read the book very differently: not in one rush but slowly, a chapter a day as a buddy read.

He slowly gets back the memories of Duncan Idaho. But he is not only just so transforming back, but a worthwhile individual with a conflicting combination of Mentat with Zensunni background.

His discussion of consciousness and the implications on eternal life versus Paul's precognition in space and time was fascinating and gave me a lot to think.

With my current re-read, I discovered the focus on female characters: First of all the huge hole of absence of Lady Jessica, who was mentioned only a couple of times and lives her life on Caladan.

Gaius Helen Mohiam plays her role as tough negotiator and I still remember the walk of the old Reverend Mother through Paul's oversized reception hall.

The logic of the book has weaknesses but it has got the same epic, pompous grandeur and literary style as its predecessor.

Plus it is more concentrated and brisker. I was really missing the story of the 12 years following Dune. But Frank Herbert skipped that time and we have to read about those by his son in Paul of Dune.

It is a deconstruction of the first book's hero, leading to a Greek tragedy which has to end in the hero's death, freeing him from Jihad and deification.

It seriously lacks action but compensates in dialogues. With an intrigue led by the Tleilaxu together with Bene Genesserit and the Guild, the book follows a simple plot and builds up tension very slowly, only to release it at the very end of the book like a bow string released in one moment.

It is a great counterpoint to Dune but read it only if you are invested in this universe. At the same time it is only a segue to Children of Dune which made it possible that SF entered mainstream.

More thought experiment mindfuck than Space Opera spectacle as it's predecessor was , Dune Messiah imagines the whys and wherefores and whatabouts concerning prescience with a power that seems definitive and, in that way, inhibiting to all prescience tales that have followed it and are still to come.

It's the same mechanism as what Back to the Future has done to the way we think about time travel. Generations of audiences -- at least a couple, so far -- believe in inevitable paradoxes within ti More thought experiment mindfuck than Space Opera spectacle as it's predecessor was , Dune Messiah imagines the whys and wherefores and whatabouts concerning prescience with a power that seems definitive and, in that way, inhibiting to all prescience tales that have followed it and are still to come.

Generations of audiences -- at least a couple, so far -- believe in inevitable paradoxes within time travel, that ripples in the time stream will change everything, that people, places and things will disappear under the influence of the smallest interferences.

They are sure of it to the point that "new" imaginings of time travel and even older imaginings of time travel, like The City on the Edge of Forever are criticized as "breaking the rules" of time travel or "failing to make sense.

Any story that includes time travel is, by its nature, a thought experiment and nothing more. There is no time travel, therefore there can be no right or wrong so long as it maintains its internal logic when it comes to time travel at least not until there is time travel and we can actually start to understand its actual "laws".

If some day, some one, some where can foresee the future, I imagine prescience playing out in precisely the way Herbert imagined it would manifest in Paul Atreides so there is me, fooled by a great thought experiment.

Whatever shortcomings this book has and there are a few , they are eclipsed by the fierce creativity behind Herbert's imaginings of foresight.

It's an impressive feat. He may not be my favourite Sci-Fi writer not even close , but his brilliance has my respect.

It is complicated. In the middle pagesI thought : this is crazy. They are a bunch of drugged characters full of Spice and completely nuts.

But the end saved the book. Then I will try to read the third part. Aug 31, Chaunceton Bird rated it really liked it Shelves: sci-fi-hi-fi.

Excellent sequel. It is evident that this wasn't in Mr. Herbert's mind when he wrote the first Dune, but it's just as clear that this is going to be an incredible six-part saga.

Now the ball is rolling. This book was every bit as terrible as I remembered. I was committed to not abandoning it as I did last time because I want to delve a little further into the Dune series.

Dune is one of my favorite novels. Even through there is precedent, it is hard to accept that sequels can be such a complete reversal.

Dune is a strong story about an interesting life. A minor weakness of the book is that it is asserted, but never shown, that the events unfolding will impact inter-galactic empires, create a hol This book was every bit as terrible as I remembered.

A minor weakness of the book is that it is asserted, but never shown, that the events unfolding will impact inter-galactic empires, create a holy jihad and cause the rise of a major religion centering on the main character.

This fails to hurt the book because of none of this actually happens within the confines of Dune, aside from a minor scene at the end that crowns him.

This event, in itself, is consistent with the plot. Dune Messiah starts with having accepted that all we were told to expect has happened and then wallows in the religious weirdness it creates.

Very little happens. I'm not sure it is possible to recover from here, but will try Children of Dune before giving up. After re-reading Dune recently, I decided to finally get around to reading Dune Messiah - the sequel to Dune and the bridge to Children of Dune.

Unfortunately, Dune Messiah is a whole lot of standing around and talking for the entire book. It took me a long time to read because I just couldn't find the motivation to keep wading through dense dialogue, and when I did reach the end, I found it sadly to be short and quick, which didn't make up for the long, long drawn-out nature of the book.

Dune Messiah is a science fiction novel by American writer Frank Herbert , the second in his Dune series of six novels. A sequel to Dune , it was originally serialized in Galaxy magazine in , and then published by Putnam the same year.

By accepting the role of messiah to the Fremen , Paul had unleashed a jihad which conquered most of the known universe. Although 61 billion people have perished, Paul's prescient visions indicate that this is far from the worst possible outcome for humanity.

Motivated by this knowledge, Paul hopes to set humanity on a course that will not inevitably lead to stagnation and destruction, while at the same time acting as ruler of the empire and focal point of the Fremen religion.

Paul has refused to father a child with Irulan or even touch her , but his Fremen concubine Chani has also failed to produce an heir, causing tension within his monarchy.

Desperate both to secure her place in the Atreides dynasty and to preserve the Atreides bloodline for the Bene Gesserit breeding program , Irulan has secretly been giving contraceptives to Chani.

Paul is aware of this fact, but has foreseen that the birth of his heir will bring Chani's death, and does not want to lose her. The conspirators hope the presence of Hayt will undermine Paul's ability to rule by forcing Paul to question himself and the empire he has created.

Furthermore, Paul's acceptance of the gift weakens his support among the Fremen, who see the Tleilaxu and their tools as unclean.

Chani, taking matters into her own hands, switches to a traditional Fremen fertility diet, preventing Irulan from being able to tamper with her food, and soon becomes pregnant.

Otheym , one of Paul's former Fedaykin death commandos, reveals evidence of a Fremen conspiracy against Paul. Otheym gives Paul his dwarf Tleilaxu servant Bijaz, who like a recording machine, can remember faces, names, and details.

Paul accepts reluctantly, seeing the strands of a Tleilaxu plot. As Paul's soldiers attack the conspirators, others set off an atomic weapon called a stone burner , purchased from the Tleilaxu, that destroys the area and blinds Paul.

By tradition, all blind Fremen exile themselves in the desert. But Paul shocks the Fremen and entrenches his godhood by proving he can still see, even without eyes.

His oracular powers have become so developed that he can foresee in his mind everything that happens, as though his eyes still function. By moving through his life in lockstep with his visions, he can see even the slightest details of the world around him.

Bijaz, an agent of the Tleilaxu, uses a specific humming intonation to implant a command that will compel Hayt to attempt to kill Paul under certain circumstances.

Chani dies in childbirth, and Paul's reaction to her death triggers Hayt, who attempts to kill Paul.

Hayt's ghola body reacts against its own programming and Duncan's full consciousness is recovered, simultaneously making him independent of Tleilaxu control.

Zur Kasse. Gaminator Book Of Ra Play Free haftender Gesellschafter: Stacked Deutsch. He is best known for creating the world of Rtl Spi, which established Frank Herbert as a master of modern science fiction. Sucheinstellungen Suchtipps. Mass Market Paperback. Bitte loggen Sie sich zunächst in Ihr Kundenkonto ein oder registrieren Sie sich bei bücher. DUNE MESSIAH: the extraordinary sequel to Dune, the greatest science fiction novel of all time. Twelve years after his victory over House Harkonnen, Paul. The story begun in Frank Herbert's classic novel Dune continues with Dune Messiah, an extraordinary novel about the price of victory and the cost of war. Dune Messiah von Herbert, Frank: und eine große Auswahl ähnlicher Bücher, Kunst und Sammlerstücke erhältlich auf laurencelibert.be Dune Messiah continues the story of Paul Atreides, better known - and feared - as the man christened MuadDib. As Emperor of the Known Universe. éditeur Dummy à définir Herbert, Frank: Dune Messiah jetzt online kaufen bei Letzshop ✓ Im Geschäft in Ettelbruck vorrätig ✓ Online bestellen.

Dune Messiah Video

Dune Messiah - Bene Gesserit Doublespeak

In the event that you are Bene Geserit, you would effectively meddle with Paul. In the event that you are from one of the vanquished universes, you likely not be cheerful about this sharp person being ruler.

In the event that you are a Paul pupil, you will kick the bucket for him and the hell with any other person. Hence the battle card is set: Paul and his clique versus every one of his spoilers, for all intents and purposes everybody in the universe.

Herbert gives us the pass up blow in a moderately minimized rundown. Maybe the above is a bit excessively coldhearted. Suffice it to state that on the off chance that you hope to discover Mr.

Awesome saint in this, you ought to look somewhere else. In like manner on the off chance that you require a warm and fluffy sentiment or a shootemup space musical drama, you might not have any desire to wander here.

In any case, in the event that you need to investigate the sensible outcomes of the cost of force, and the severity it produces, this is quite recently the ticket.

I have perused and rehash this arrangement at various circumstances of my life, and each time am stunned at what I find new in each perusing. Perused this book and whatever is left of the arrangement with a receptive outlook and be stunned.

Skip to content Free Audiobooks Online. I liked her, she liked me, well, you know how these things happen. She gets pregnant.

Then, shit, I go and of course lose my sight in some kind of nuclear attack. I'm just kicking myself for being so careless.

Girlfriend dies in childbirth, par for the course, and since she has twins all my psychic powers are gone. I keep meaning to find out why that happens, but I never get round to it.

Oh well, I guess view spoiler [I'll be left to die in the wilderness as usual, and the kids will turn into godlike mutant sandworms. I'll try to do better next time.

View all 41 comments. Buddy read with Athena! Dune has become the political and economical centre of the universe, and the Qizarate priesthood has spread Muad'dib's name throughout space and turned him into not only an emperor with absolute power, but a Buddy read with Athena!

Dune has become the political and economical centre of the universe, and the Qizarate priesthood has spread Muad'dib's name throughout space and turned him into not only an emperor with absolute power, but a god in his own right.

Yet there are those who would topple the god emperor from his religious throne. In the grand circles of power, a new conspiracy arises from the shadows.

Its goals and ambitions are many, and it seeks to infiltrate the ranks of the Atreides and the Fremen, striking at those closest to the emperor in order to remove him from power.

And each step brings its plans closer to succeeding. It cannot stand up to the wonder of discovering the world of Arrakis for the first time, but it certainly has other strengths.

The setting and the writing style is mostly the same as in the first book. The story though, has changed dramatically. The first book is about Paul Atreides and his quest for vengeance against those who betrayed his family and seized their land.

The second book is about managing an empire and protecting it from a devilishly dangerous conspiracy who shuns no means to achieve what they want.

There is more political maneuvering, more hidden agendas, and more excitement for the reader. The character have also grown more interesting in the second book.

Paul, Chani and Irulan are all older and more experienced in the games of power, and were much more enjoyable to read about than they were in the first one.

And perhaps the most fascinating character of them all is Alia, Paul's sister. Still only fifteen years of age, she is both a Reverend Mother of the Bene Gesserit, a leader of the Qizarate priesthood, and a powerful voice in the Imperial Council.

What truly made me decide to let this book keep the five stars from the first time I read it, was the ending. I will not go into details about it, but only say that this may be the most beautiful ending I have ever read in a sci-fi or fantasy book ever.

For those of you who have read Dune and are debating with yourselves whether or not to read its sequels, I hope this review will be helpful in deciding.

For those of you who haven't read any of the books from this universe, know that it is in my eyes one of the greatest fictional series of all time.

I would definitely recommend it to every single one of you, because it's a wonderful story with few equals in the world of science fiction.

Such a rich store of myths enfolds Paul Muad'dib, the Mentat Emperor, and his sister, Alia, it is difficult to see the real persons behind these veils.

But there were, after all, a man born Paul Atreides and a woman born Alia. Their flesh was subject to space and time. And even though their oracular powers placed them beyond the usual limits of time and space, they came from human stock.

They experienced real events which left real traces upon a real universe. To understand them, it must be seen that their catastrophe was the catastrophe of all mankind.

This work is dedicated, then, not to Muad'dib or his sister, but to their heirs - to all of us. View all 21 comments. Having re-read Dune and reviewed it here on GR recently, I figured I should continue and read at least the initial trilogy with Dune Messiah and Children of Dune to get a better idea of the world that Frank Herbert created.

I am glad that I read Dune Messiah. It is an excellent novel about destiny and fate and how much of it we can control. We get more insight into the Navigators - here I noticed that, unlike in Dune, we actually meet a Navigator one of the three primary conspirators against Having re-read Dune and reviewed it here on GR recently, I figured I should continue and read at least the initial trilogy with Dune Messiah and Children of Dune to get a better idea of the world that Frank Herbert created.

We get more insight into the Navigators - here I noticed that, unlike in Dune, we actually meet a Navigator one of the three primary conspirators against Paul Maud'dib which means that David Lynch most have read this book as well before making his cult classic movie of the first book.

We also learn more about the Bene Geserits and the Mentats. I found it particularly fascinating that the Butlerian Jihad, which takes place a few hundred years before the action in Dune and Dune Messiah, was actually, if I understood correctly, a war of humans against machines which the humans won.

Following this victory, computers were banished from the known universe and instead Mentats and Navigators inspired by melange made from spice were bred to be human computers for political and financial strategy in the former case, and for navigation in space-time for the latter.

This fascinated me because I have read and watched so much science fiction where the machines win or are winning such as in Ghost in the Shell or Neuromancer, or Blade Runner, or Hyperion and Dune is one of the rare universes where humans won and yet, at what cost?

Banning machines seems to have brought humans back to a medieval society with its aristocracies House Corrino, House Harkkonen, House Atreides and oppression and genetic manipulation Bene Gesserit.

And once the Fremen rally around Paul to destroy two of the three houses and install Paul as the new Emperor and as the Dune Messiah, is this new regime really a new start for humanity or just another autocratic regime.

It sure looks like that latter and we get inklings of this as the Fremen go spread the Gospel of their Maud'dib and subsequently spilling not just a little blood.

All of these things continue to torture Paul as they did in Dune and yet he is inevitably driven forward by this messianic destiny.

Enter the conspiracy of a Bene Gesserit priestess, a rogue Navigator and a strange Face Dancer who want to topple Paul's regime, well more specifically kill his Fremen wife and force him to sleep with his sister Alia ewww!!

Another piece of the puzzle here is the reappearance of Duncan Idaho, mentor and friend to Paul as a Zensunni master which has unintended consequences.

Zensunnism in itself is a fascinating blend of Sunni Islam and Zen Buddhism that also is followed by the Freman. In essence, Herbert created a universe where classic monarchal hegemonies come into conflict with religious fanatics - in a sense we can see the Fremen hordes as marauding Zen Buddhist priests in ancient Japan fighting the Emperor, well that is one image that came into my mind anyway, so as not to wear out the old Western capitalism vs Islamic obscurantism trope.

While perhaps less expansive and mind-blowing than the first Dune, Dune Messiah still delivers punches as a great plot with convincing characters and lots of philosophical questions.

On to Children of Dune! I have since finished the whole canonical series and enjoyed all of it. View all 8 comments. So I thought Dune was the best thing since the bound codex, right?

And I read it about five times over the course of my young-adulthood. And then I read Messiah and was pretty much completely dissatisfied.

Not enough to give it a poor rating, since it is interesting I mean, we all still care about Paul, even if he is a whiner and it did keep my attention.

You haven't seen foreshadowing until you've read Dune Messiah. It takes that to a whole new, grotesque level.

And pretentiousness. Thought Du So I thought Dune was the best thing since the bound codex, right? Thought Dune was pretentious?

This one makes Dune look like a chimney-sweep in comparison. It's as though Frank Herbert managed to make a blunt weapon out of pretentiousness and use it directly on the reader's mind.

My final impression was of just another massive philosophical acid trip consisting of a bunch of people smarter than me bandying hints and portentous minutiae in the middle of a half-realized desert wonderland for over three hundred pages.

And I didn't really care about Duncan Idaho, anyway, since he was only in Dune for like forty pages and he only spoke about twice. Telling me ten times in a row that Paul really really liked Idaho is not going to make me feel the same way about him, Frank Herbert!

Now I'm afraid to read number three. Twelve years have passed since the evens of the last book.

Paul Atreides became an Emperor of the major part of the inhabited space worlds residing on planet Arrakis aka Dune. The Jihad he launched enveloped lots of planets and Paul realized it is often so much easier to start something than put an end to it.

Literally everybody and their brother with even residual lust for power decided Paul the Emperor had overstayed his welcome; the time for good old conspiracies of all sorts had come.

The fi Twelve years have passed since the evens of the last book. The first thing that came to my mind and stayed there through the whole reading was the radical change of the meaning of word Jihad since the book publication.

It completely lost it mystique and became synonymous with expression "lots of innocents killed just because, often brutally".

For this reason my perception of Paul was different from what the author intended even though I tried to keep in mind the original intention of Frank Herbert.

Before I wrote my review I looked though those of other people and one person really nailed it. I could not have said it better myself and so I just repeat it here.

Paul feels exactly like Harry Potter hard to believe the comparison, is not it? I even included the image of the book for you to make sure you read it right.

They are both full of angst. At least the Hogwarts student has a legitimate excuse: he is of the right age which Paul should have overgrown a long time ago.

A conclusion follows: if you like fifth installment of Harry Potter for its angst, this book is for you. The first book has shown us the great world that feels alive.

It had action, adventure, and flat characters with a sole exception of Paul himself I could also include Jessica here given enough pressure to do so.

The good? Of action and adventure there was no trace left. The only part which could be called action I am really stretching the definition here took about a couple of pages total.

Paul's inaction, this is what. Let me explain. Paul could see the future. Well, except the times when he could not see it not to spoil the plot device.

So he knew about a conspiracy, for example. He also knew about its main people. He could also see that removing main conspirator A would mean Really Bad Things for Paul down the road.

The same can be said about conspirator B. At this point I have no idea why not to remove all of the conspirators.

This would take care of the whole problem, would not it? Paul, apparently having never heard about a man being a master of his destiny, decided to remain passive.

Angst ensures. I am afraid I made this book sound much worse than it actually is. After all, it is still Dune and some interesting developments took place.

It did set the scene for interesting things to come and my resolve to continue with the series has not weakened any. It is just that I expected something different from this book.

View all 14 comments. Frank Herbert returned to Arrakis for a book that was very different from the action packed first volume of the series, but at the same time, still held a lot of the familiar.

When I tell people that I actually enjoyed the sequel to Dune more than the original, the answer I get from the overwhelming majority is, "Wait.

Dune has a sequel? Some people may be vaguely aware that the movie was based on a book, but never bothered to pick it up or look for sequels.

Which is a shame, because they're missing out on this little gem of a book. Twelve years after taking the throne of the empire for himself in Dune, Paul "Muad'Dib" Atreides has become something of a God, or Savior figure to the Fremen, who have taken up arms and spread out throughout the entire known universe bringing a Holy War to subjugate all beneath his rule.

All of this, very much against Paul's own wishes. He has become a figurehead, standing atop the empire as Emperor, while priests of the religion that worships him rule in his name.

He has made good his promise to begin turning Dune into a paradise, and now the desert runs freely with water. Another sign to his followers of his godhood.

Princess Irulan, Paul's trophy wife, and the means by which he secured the throne is anxious to follow her Bene Gesserit orders to bear the royal heir, but Paul has no love for her and refuses it to her, instead remaining true to his real, Fremen wife Chani.

This leads Irulan to join a conspiracy against the Emperor, meant to discredit him, destroy his reputation, and take the wind out of the Fremen Zealots' sails.

Out of spite, she has been feeding Chani contraceptives to prevent her from ever bearing Paul an heir, but this plan failed, and Chani conceived anyway.

Through the powers of his oracular sight, he can still see, though his body is blind. Long story short, after Chani dies in childbirth, Paul wanders into the desert alone, blind and broken, never to be seen again, and leaving the Empire in the hands of his sister Alia until his children are old enough to assume rule.

Again, Frank Herbert did a ridiculous amount of research before writing this book. It shows in how he truly understands the mechanics of economics, politics, and religion.

The religion that he has built up around Paul is intriguing, and realistic, and the atrocities that its zealots commit in his name feel logical, and realistic as well.

Paul's suffering under the burden of the sins of those who follow him is really well done. This book is more a character study on him, than really anything else, showing the impact his actions have had on him as a person.

This is a very different kind of book than the first in the series. Where the first book was all about war, this one is all about the consequences of it on the man that started it all.

Despite its short length, this book has a very big and important message, and it delivers it exquisitely. Many people tend to complain that this book is rather boring after the first one, but I found Paul's inner struggles to be just as, or perhaps even more entertaining than the battles of conquest and Paul's coming of age, etc from the first book.

This book is remarkably better written and put together than the first book. Not only did Frank Herbert apparently do quite a bit of research in the four years between books, but he also improved on his skills as a writer quite a bit.

The storyline is tighter, less convoluted and far less confusing than that of the first book. It almost reads like something written by a completely different writer because of the increased quality of the writing, and the change of focus, but at the same time, it still has his unique style and flair to it.

The Bad? This is where the story is told by a narrator in third person that will change viewpoints between characters at the drop of a hat, without warning when any given character has any important thoughts or observations on what's going on.

I find it to be rather confusing and distracting at times, and I've always thought of the style as rather amateurish. This is wholly a point of opinion, and true, many very good books are written in this particular perspective, but I don't like it, and will always count it as a bad mark against any book it appears in.

Frank Herbert doesn't really seem to "get" female characters. He doesn't really seem to understand what motivates women, how they think, how they act, how they talk, and why they do the things that they do.

Going by his female characters, one could almost say that he never met a real woman in his life. As such, they are basically just men with breasts.

They have all the right girly bits, because someone in the universe has to, but the their minds and personalities are about the furthest thing from feminine as is possible.

Back in the '60s this was a VERY common thing, which is getting somewhat better these days, but still lingers on.

Frank Herbert's portrayal of women fits those of the times, but to anyone that might be, or has ever actually met, a real woman before, it's going to feel a bit off.

Back in the day this sort of thing was acceptable, but I find it to be annoying and distracting, if not downright offensive, in this day and age.

In conclusion, Dune Messiah is a VERY different type of book than its predecessor Dune, and it does have its vices, but the good more than outweighs the bad by far.

The focus on Paul's dilemma with the Jihad that he inadvertently started is spectacular. Watching his inner turmoil over the countless billions that have died in his name play out is excellent.

And if the female characters are off, everything else is dead on. He's created a fantastic world, with fantastic people if you think of them all as men, anyway to live in it, and did a great deal of research to make everything from the economics to the religion feel realistic.

As an entry in the Dune Saga, it's probably one of the best. Check out my other reviews. I really liked Frank Herbert's classic science fiction novel Dune when I first read it a few months ago --so much so that I named it one of the best books I read that year.

But upon finally getting around to the sequel, Dune Messiah I'm pretty disappointed. It's really boring. Don't get me wrong, I can see some of the impressive literary clockwork that Herbert assembles in the book.

It also follows through on one of the more interesting concepts introduced in the first book: Paul's spice-induced ability to foresee the eventual species-wide extinction of humans and the hard choices he has to make in order to steer history towards a lesser evil.

Indeed, Messiah fast forwards to a point where Paul's fanatic followers have propagated a holy war that has destroyed entire planets and left over 60 billion people dead in just a few years.

By those measures, Paul is the worst monster history has ever created, yet he has to bear the mostly private burden of knowing that he's killing all those people to save the race as a whole while simultaneously trying to outmaneuver his political opponents and crafty assassins.

The problem I have with Messiah is that it suffers acutely from a kind of talking head syndrome. It's not until the back sixth or so of the book that anything interesting happens.

Dune had sword fights, skirmishes, Paul and his mother tromping around the deadly desert of Arakis meeting and learning about the Fremen, and all other kinds of adventures.

Messiah devotes literally dozens of pages at a time to sitting in a room listening to conspirators talk to each other. And then talking about what the talking means.

And then thinking about what the talking about the talking means. It's terrible and jarring to see how Herbert has switched gears so abruptly from fascinating adventure and world building to stark exposition and naval gazing.

Not that some of the ideas aren't interesting. The way that Paul must grapple with his precognition and how he has to grasp at things to try and leave humanity on the path to survival in the wake of his inevitable fall is a complex and fascinating idea, for one.

And I liked the idea of how his strengths are the things that ultimately do him in --sometimes literally. It's just that I wish Herbert had found ways to make this story less tedious in its execution.

Is the third book any better? I'm on the fence at this point. View 2 comments. By accepting the role of messiah to the Fremen, Paul had unleashed a jihad which conquered most of the known universe.

While Paul is the most powerful emperor ever known, he is powerless to stop the lethal excesses of the religious juggernaut he Dune Messiah Dune 2 , Frank Herbert Dune Messiah is a science fiction novel by American writer Frank Herbert, the second in his Dune series of six novels.

While Paul is the most powerful emperor ever known, he is powerless to stop the lethal excesses of the religious juggernaut he has created.

Although 61 billion people have perished, Paul's prescient visions indicate that this is far from the worst possible outcome for humanity.

Motivated by this knowledge, Paul hopes to set humanity on a course that will not inevitably lead to stagnation and destruction, while at the same time acting as ruler of the empire and focal point of the Fremen religion.

When I first read Dune Messiah , it was nearly twenty years ago and like a lot things time had erased most of the details from my brain - including the ending.

So digging into it last week was a treat; felt like something new. From re-discovering characters and themes, to gaining an understanding that my seventeen-year-old brain wasn't able to yet comprehend.

As a note on my assessment style: Part of me wants to respond to other reviewers here on Goodreads concerning their literary criticisms.

How When I first read Dune Messiah , it was nearly twenty years ago and like a lot things time had erased most of the details from my brain - including the ending.

I come from the school of: A review should stand on its own merits. But I have a little cheat here - I can respond to what my younger self thought of Dune Messiah.

The Nick West of twenty years ago did have some criticisms of this book that may have been rooted in misunderstanding — and at the very least, a sense of disappointment or superb literary let-down.

As I respond to Nick of the 90s, you can parallel similar themes in other 2 and 3 star reviews on this site.

So here we are: You the reader, Nicholas at age 37, and Nick at age I had it on my Goodreads for 10 days, but really I ate up the bulk of the text in a three day page-burner.

Gone is the fairy-tale magic of a young man forced into extraordinary circumstances. Instead, we get the biggest realization that Nicholas at age 37 has had about the Dune series: Those aspects of fantasy and science fiction tropes that got me into the story, seemingly became absent concepts in Book Two.

While not incidental , those surface elements are incidentally the thing that I got hung up on the first time I read this series.

Frank Herbert has this reputation for making Dune some impenetrable document as rigid, complicated, and vengeful as the Old Testament.

On the surface, the first Dune book was a seemingly simple story of betrayal and revenge. The world building, interpersonal relationships, religious philosophies, and political intrigue are as deep as anything ever put into fiction.

The vengeful part is, however, accurate. So, when teenage Nick finished Dune ; what felt like the most epic journey my imagination had ever been on, only to crack open the next book and feel like I was thrust into the pages of a bad pulp novel, it felt a bit confusing.

I read the prologue which contained on-the-nose dialogues by some nameless jailer and a historian. The next chapter introduced me to Face Dancers, gaseous fish-men, and a conspiracy to kick the book into gear — It is a little pulpy.

But the Harkonnens are pretty damn pulpy too. As adversaries they are supervillain-gaga. Maybe you just missed it missed it because of how epic the story was around them.

With a healthy dose of psychedelia and the best world building since Tolkien. But the heart of the matter is that Herbert had a vision visions!

But with Dune Messiah , we definitely went waist deep. I think Frank Herbert reached his hand down my pants from a psychedelic standpoint.

Nick at 17 was let down. My expectations had been subverted. Book Two in the series is much more contemplative.

We jump into new dramas between old characters and fresh faces. And yes, teenage Nick, there is a hell of a lot of talking. But to call that boring or hard to follow betrays an unrefined mind, kid.

This novel is a procedural of emotion, passion, pleasure, the struggle with mortality — you know, the human condition — Not only did Frank Herbert up his literary game; he did so with a brevity and beauty that was perfect for this story.

And what we think of as a slow burn actually has new twists and intrigues on practically every other page. If you pay attention, which the writing makes easy to do, the payoff is a powerful one indeed.

He had allowed Or he claimed it as out of his control a horrible Jihad to rage across the universe. It just took Paul twelve years to make it work!

Paul faces several huge problems that seem insurmountable. And he feels trapped by his prescience. If one could see the future and decided on a certain path, the sheer boredom would be brutal.

But there is still too much fear for the boredom to kick in. There is a complicated conspiracy against him that is so powerful, even his knowledge of the plot cannot stop its machinations.

Paul must produce an heir. If this is done improperly, the love of his life would be tortured and turned into a slave. The unbalanced government fueled by religious zealots needs to be set on a more progressive track.

Will the conspirators win the day? Can Paul cement a legacy that reaches beyond violence? Can Chani bear a child that lives?

So we sit through all the meetings, and conversations that take place jumping between multiple points-of-view. What could have been a mess of massive internal dialogues, instead becomes a string, a chord, and finally a cable pulling the reader forward page by page.

Yes, young Nick. How could you understand the anxiety a father feels for his children? Or a husband for his wife of more than a decade?

Frank Herbert wrote a book for grown ups. All the while being heaped with a massive dose of trippy visions pulling you into the undertow of genetic and higher-thinking philosophies.

It is melancholy and poetic. So, teenage Nick, give it some time, buddy. Dune Messiah comes highly recommended from you, a man who has changed a little bit over the last twenty years.

These reviewers have just as much validity in their feelings towards the book as I do. Bolds added by me. It simply bridges the first and third.

Seriously, what is going on here? At least 30 different reviews used this terminology in my quick scan.

Firstly: What the hell is going on? Seriously, wtf? Secondly: I think most of these folks are wrong. Good stuff, Mr.

View all 17 comments. This book is very different from the first book, 'Dune' because this book has focused about the religion.

I am really enjoyed reading this book Alhamdulillah. Elements of those other aspects are still in place, but the story this time around is from people sitting at tables and discussing the existence of fate and ways to avoid prophesy rather than overthrowing evil barons.

In fact, there are times where I felt that it hardly seems like a full novel, and more like a series of short scenes Herbert wrote, pat himself on the back over how clever they were and then decided to try to tie them all together.

HA I say! The philosophy was what appealed to me the most of those aspects mentioned in Dune! I can read about people sitting at tables and talking for hours!

In fact, by the end I realized that it was an extremely well developed novel, and that it was I who was at fault for not seeing the intricacies at play.

There is no main POV character in each chapter, he will give you the thoughts of everyone, thus showing who thinks they are fooling who and who is actually fooled.

He does this and he plays it fair the entire time, yet still manages to hide plot points in plain sight, and it is extremely well played.

The first book was a masterpiece in terms of world building, here that takes a backseat to prophesies and philosophy, but Herbert does manage to introduce at least one fascinating new aspect to his universe.

The Face Dancers are introduced as assassins and shape shifters. One can walk into the room a pudgy male guard and leave as a small servant girl.

They take contracts, but with a sense of honor and a condition; they must always leave the would be victim with an opportunity to escape.

They need to know they are in danger and must be presented with an out. I find this new aspect fascinating and would have loved to see a bit more of a focus on them.

I want to close this review by briefly describing my favorite scene in the entire book; it is one of the scenes where people sit and talk at tables.

He felt it must be a prank.

After a rather dry or so pages the plot revives quite a bit and the climax is quite thrilling if not exactly unpredictable. It seriously lacks action but compensates in dialogues. Other Editions Paul faces Einarmige Kleider huge problems that seem insurmountable. Dune Messiah Dune 2 Kopf Explodiert Frank Herbert. What truly made me decide to let this book keep the five stars from the first time I read it, was the ending. Dune Messiah